* Douce Amere kicks off with licorice and a boozy note, like an orange liqueur.  Although these are sweet notes, they aren’t candied or cloyingly sweet.

* The top notes project loudly for at least an hour on my skin.  Be sure to test how they last on your skin before wearing in close quarters.

* The licorice note stays present throughout the development and acts as a haze over the cinnamon, spice, and dark cocoa that come through (as the booze wears off).

* Douce Amere means bittersweet in English which is an apt description of the scent.  Most of the notes are sweet confections but are balanced in such a way that it reads mature rather than childlike.

* The base comes across differently when I wear it.  The licorice cloud is always there, sometimes I get caramel and sandalwood while other times I get resin and vanilla.

Summary:  Douce Amere could be called an oriental gourmand, yet with all the foody notes, I don’t consider it edible. There is a real seductive, mature vibe to it.  At no point is it overly sweet, which it could easily become.   This is definitely a night fragrance and not for the office.  The base notes last on me until I shower it off. Originally, Douce Amere was part of the export collection for Serge Lutens and available everywhere.  Though it was pulled from the export line and is only available through the Paris store, I often see bottles left at Serge Lutens counters in other stores. If you like Lolita Lempicka Au Masculin and want a more mature take on licorice, this would be a great one to try.

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